Archive for the ‘Monthly sky guides’ Category

November 2014 night sky guide podcast, transcript and sky chart

Published by Sydney Observatory on October 27, 2014 No Comments

To help you learn about the southern night sky, Sydney Observatory provides an audio guide/podcast, transcript of that audio, and a sky map or chart each month. This month’s guide is presented by Melissa Hulbert, Sydney Observatory Astronomy Educator.

In the November sky guide, as well as showing us where to find the constellations Pegasus, Orion and Taurus, and the star clusters, Hyades and Pleiades, Mel tells us the best times to see the bright planets Venus and Jupiter.

Mel also tells us where we can hope to see Comet C/2012 K1 PanSTARRS during November. For this and more, listen to the November 2014 night sky guide audio, or read the transcript below.

HEAR THE AUDIO
You can subscribe with iTunes or upload the (16 minutes 46 seconds) audio to your iPod or mp3 player, or listen to it on your computer.

SEE THE SKY CHART
We provide an embedded sky map (below) and a November 2014 night sky chart (PDF) which shows the stars, constellations and planets visible in the night sky from anywhere in Australia. To view PDF star charts you will need to download and install Adobe Acrobat Reader if it’s not on your computer already.

November 2014 night sky chart

BUY THE BOOK
Our annual book, ‘The 2015 Australasian sky guide’ by Dr Nick Lomb has more information and star maps for months from December 2014 until December 2015 inclusive, plus information about the Sun, twilight, the Moon and tides, and a host of other fascinating astronomical information. You can purchase it ($16.95) at Sydney Observatory and Powerhouse Museum shops or other good bookshops, or online through Powerhouse Publishing (additional packing/postage costs apply). The 2015 edition, which will be the 25th anniversary edition, is now available!

READ THE TRANSCRIPT (after the jump)

(more…)

October 2014 night sky guide podcast, transcript and sky chart

Published by Sydney Observatory on September 25, 2014 1 Comment

Orionids meteor shower expected to peak on 21 October

Dr Andrew JacobTo help you learn about the southern night sky, Sydney Observatory provides an audio guide/podcast, transcript of that audio, and a sky map or chart each month. This month’s guide is presented by Dr Andrew Jacob (pictured, right), Assistant Curator of Astronomy at Sydney Observatory.

This month, find out how to find the South Celestial Pole, and where to find stars and constellations including Crux (the Southern Cross) and the Pointer stars, the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds, the bright star Antares at the heart of Scorpius. Andrew also tells us about some good photo opportunities from 25th to 28th October when the crescent Moon passes by Saturn, then Antares and finally, Mars. And of course, there is the Orionids meteor shower to look out for during the nights and pre-dawn during October.

For all this and more, listen to the October 2014 night sky guide audio, or read the transcript below.

HEAR THE AUDIO
You can subscribe with iTunes or upload the (24 mins 48 secs) audio to your iPod or mp3 player, or listen to it on your computer.

SEE THE SKY CHART
We provide an embedded sky map (below) and a October 2014 night sky chart (PDF) which shows the stars, constellations and planets visible in the night sky from anywhere in Australia. To view PDF star charts you will need to download and install Adobe Acrobat Reader if it’s not on your computer already.

October 2014 night sky chart

BUY THE BOOK
Our annual book, ‘The Australasian sky guide’, by Dr Nick Lomb has more information and star maps for months from December until December inclusive, plus information about the Sun, twilight, the Moon and tides, and a host of other fascinating astronomical information. You can purchase it ($16.95) at Sydney Observatory and Powerhouse Museum shops or other good bookshops, or online through Powerhouse Publishing (additional packing/postage costs apply). You can buy the 2014 book now, or wait until November and buy the 2015 edition – which will be the 25th anniversary edition.

READ THE TRANSCRIPT (after the jump)

(more…)

September 2014 night sky guide podcast, transcript and sky chart

Published by Sydney Observatory on August 27, 2014 1 Comment

To help you learn about the southern night sky, Sydney Observatory provides an audio guide/podcast, transcript of that audio, and a sky map or chart each month. This month’s guide is presented by Geoffrey Wyatt, Sydney Observatory’s Senior Astronomy Educator.

Geoff fascinates us with his guide to the stars and constellations to look out for in September and also with insight into how astronomy was important to the ancient people of Mesopotamia, Greece and Rome.

Geoff tells us where and when to look out at night for the planets Mercury, Mars, Saturn in September. And he points out his highlight for the month, on 1st September when, shortly after sunset, Saturn, the Moon and Mars will all be in the constellation of Libra, with the Moon and Saturn just five degrees (or five pinkie widths) apart.

Listen to the September 2014 night sky guide audio, or read the transcript below.

HEAR THE AUDIO
You can subscribe with iTunes or upload the (34 mins) audio to your iPod or mp3 player, or listen to it on your computer.

SEE THE SKY CHART
We provide an embedded sky map (below) and a September 2014 night sky chart (PDF) which shows the stars, constellations and planets visible in the night sky from anywhere in Australia. To view PDF star charts you will need to download and install Adobe Acrobat Reader if it’s not on your computer already.

September 2014 night sky chart

BUY THE BOOK
Our annual book, ‘The 2014 Australasian sky guide’, by Dr Nick Lomb has more information and star maps for months from December 2013 until December 2015 inclusive (or wait till November when you can purchase the 2015 book), plus information about the Sun, twilight, the Moon and tides, and a host of other fascinating astronomical information. You can purchase it ($16.95) at Sydney Observatory and Powerhouse Museum shops or other good bookshops, or online through Powerhouse Publishing (additional packing/postage costs apply).

READ THE TRANSCRIPT (after the jump)

(more…)

August 2014 night sky guide podcast, transcript and sky chart

Published by Sydney Observatory on July 25, 2014 No Comments

To help you learn about the southern night sky, Sydney Observatory provides an audio guide/podcast, transcript of that audio, and a sky map or chart each month. This month’s guide is presented by Melissa Hulbert, Sydney Observatory Astronomy Educator.

Mel suggests stars and constellations to look out for this month include Scorpius, with the red star at its heart, Antares; Sagittarius (which looks more like a teapot than a centaur); Crux – more commonly known as the Southern Cross; and Ophiuchus, the 13th sign of the zodiac! Mel also tells us the best times and dates to try to see the planets Venus, Saturn, Jupiter, Mars and Mercury.

For more, listen to the August 2014 night sky guide audio, or read the transcript below.

HEAR THE AUDIO
You can subscribe with iTunes or upload the (18 mins 40 secs) audio to your iPod or mp3 player, or listen to it on your computer.

SEE THE SKY CHART
We provide an embedded sky map (below) and an August 2014 night sky chart (PDF) which shows the stars, constellations and planets visible in the night sky from anywhere in Australia. To view PDF star charts you will need to download and install Adobe Acrobat Reader if it’s not on your computer already.

August 2014 night sky chart

BUY THE BOOK
Our annual book, ‘The 2014 Australasian sky guide’, by Dr Nick Lomb has more information and star maps for months from December 2013 until December 2014 inclusive (next year’s, likely to be available from November, will have months from December 2014 to December 2015), plus information about the Sun, twilight, the Moon and tides, and a host of other fascinating astronomical information. You can purchase it ($16.95) at Sydney Observatory and Powerhouse Museum shops or other good bookshops, or online through Powerhouse Publishing (additional packing/postage costs apply).

READ THE TRANSCRIPT (after the jump)

(more…)

To help you learn about the southern night sky, Sydney Observatory provides an audio guide/podcast, transcript of that audio, and a sky map or chart each month. This month’s guide is presented by Dr Nick Lomb, Sydney Observatory’s Curator of Astronomy.

Nick guides us through July stars, constellations and a globular cluster, and also includes intriguing facts such as this: if Antares (the star that is the heart of the Scorpion) were in the position of our Sun, it would engulf not only Earth but also Mars. Lucky for us it’s where it is, in Scorpius. Nick’s tour of the stars also refers to some ancient Greek myths that related to the sky.

There is quite a choice of planets you can find this month with Nick’s help, some at night, some early in the morning. To find out when and where to look for Mars, Jupiter and Saturn in the evening and for Mercury and Venus in the morning, listen to the audio, or read the transcript below.

HEAR THE AUDIO
You can subscribe with iTunes or upload the (28 mins) audio to your iPod or mp3 player, or listen to it on your computer.

SEE THE SKY CHART
We provide an embedded sky map (below) and a July 2014 night sky chart as a printable PDF which shows the stars, constellations and planets visible in the night sky from anywhere in Australia. To view PDF star charts you will need to download and install Adobe Acrobat Reader if it’s not on your computer already.

July 2014 night sky chart

BUY THE BOOK
Our annual book, ‘The 2014 Australasian sky guide’, by Dr Nick Lomb has more information and star maps for months from December 2013 until December 2014 inclusive, plus information about the Sun, twilight, the Moon and tides, and a host of other fascinating astronomical information. You can purchase it ($16.95) at Sydney Observatory and Powerhouse Museum shops or other good bookshops, or online through Powerhouse Publishing (additional packing/postage costs apply).

READ THE TRANSCRIPT (after the jump)

(more…)

Geoff Wyatt using the north dome telescope, image courtesy AAP Reuters

Geoff Wyatt using the north dome telescope, image courtesy AAP Reuters

To help you learn about the southern night sky, Sydney Observatory provides an audio guide/podcast, transcript of that audio, and a sky map or chart each month. This month’s guide is presented by Geoffrey Wyatt, Astronomy Educator at Sydney Observatory.

Geoff’s enthusiasm and humour are captivating but based on sound science, and enriched with stories of historical and cultural aspects of astronomy, including Indigenous and Greek myths. According to some Indigenous communities, there is an Emu in the sky (see picture, below).

The EmuGeoff reckons that June is a great month to see the brightest part of the Milky Way high overhead. So go on, get a blanket and a torch with red cellophane on the front, your free sky chart and audio (below) and go outside, and look up at the wonder of the Universe.

HEAR THE AUDIO
You can subscribe with iTunes or upload the (51 mins 43 secs) audio to your iPod or mp3 player, or listen to it on your computer.

SEE THE SKY CHART
We provide an embedded sky map (below) and a June 2014 night sky chart (PDF) which shows the stars, constellations and planets visible in the night sky from anywhere in Australia. To view PDF star charts you will need to download and install Adobe Acrobat Reader if it’s not on your computer already.

June 2014 night sky chart

BUY THE BOOK
Our annual book, ‘The 2014 Australasian sky guide’, by Dr Nick Lomb has more information and star maps for months from December 2013 until December 2014 inclusive, plus information about the Sun, twilight, the Moon and tides, and a host of other fascinating astronomical information. You can purchase it ($16.95) at Sydney Observatory and Powerhouse Museum shops or other good bookshops, or online through Powerhouse Publishing (additional packing/postage costs apply).

READ THE TRANSCRIPT (after the jump)

(more…)

To help you learn about the southern night sky, Sydney Observatory provides an audio guide/podcast, transcript of that audio, and a sky map or chart each month. This month’s guide is presented by Melissa Hulbert, one of Sydney Observatory’s Astronomy Educators.

Mel guides you to find the constellations, Orion, Scorpius and Crux (the Southern Cross), along with related ancient Greek and Australian Indigenous astronomical mythologies. She also helps you find some star clusters, including the Jewel Box. And she tells us about the Eta Aquarid meteor shower to look out for in May.

There’s a lot happening in our sky this month, so listen to the audio, or read the transcript below for more details.

HEAR THE AUDIO
You can subscribe with iTunes or upload the (13 mins 03 secs) audio to your iPod or mp3 player, or listen to it on your computer.

SEE THE SKY CHART
We provide an embedded sky map (below) and a May 2014 night sky chart (PDF) which shows the stars, constellations and planets visible in the night sky from anywhere in Australia. To view PDF star charts you will need to download and install Adobe Acrobat Reader if it’s not on your computer already.

BUY THE BOOK
Our annual book, ‘The 2014 Australasian sky guide’, by Dr Nick Lomb has more information and star maps for months from December 2013 until December 2014 inclusive, plus information about the Sun, twilight, the Moon and tides, and a host of other fascinating astronomical information. You can purchase it ($16.95) at Sydney Observatory and Powerhouse Museum shops or other good bookshops, or online through Powerhouse Publishing (additional packing/postage costs apply).

READ THE TRANSCRIPT (after the jump)

(more…)

Dr Nick LombTo help you learn about the southern night sky, Sydney Observatory provides an audio guide/podcast, transcript of that audio, and a sky map or chart each month. This month’s guide is presented by Dr Nick Lomb, Sydney Observatory’s Curator of Astronomy.

A MONTH OF ECLIPSES!

April 2014 is a month of eclipses – with both a total eclipse of the Moon and also a partial eclipse of the Sun. Listen to the podcast or read the transcript below to find out when and where to look to experience these astronomical events.

In this month’s podcast, Nick also tells us about stars that look from Earth like single stars but are actually multiple stars. For example, the star we think of as Castor – one of the two most prominent stars, Castor and Pollux, in the constellation of Gemini the Twins – is actually six stars!

Other constellations Nick tells us about this month are Orion, Leo the Lion, and Crux – also known as the Southern Cross.

For this and much more, listen to the audio, or read the transcript below for more details.

HEAR THE AUDIO
You can subscribe with iTunes or upload the (28 mins 38 secs) audio to your iPod or mp3 player, or listen to it on your computer.

SEE THE SKY CHART
We provide an embedded sky map (below) and an April 2014 night sky chart (PDF) which shows the stars, constellations and planets visible in the night sky from anywhere in Australia. To view PDF star charts you will need to download and install Adobe Acrobat Reader if it’s not on your computer already.

BUY THE BOOK
Our annual book, ‘The 2014 Australasian sky guide’, by Dr Nick Lomb has more information and star maps for months from December 2013 until December 2014 inclusive, plus information about the Sun, twilight, the Moon and tides, and a host of other fascinating astronomical information. You can purchase it ($16.95) at Sydney Observatory and Powerhouse Museum shops or other good bookshops, or online through Powerhouse Publishing (additional packing/postage costs apply).

READ THE TRANSCRIPT (after the jump)

(more…)

To help you learn about the southern night sky, Sydney Observatory provides an audio guide/podcast, transcript of that audio, and a sky map or chart each month. This month’s guide is presented by Geoffrey Wyatt, Sydney Observatory’s Astronomy Education Officer.

If you’re not sure how to find your way around the night sky, Geoff presents some easy tips for how you can find angles above the horizon just using your fist, fingers and arm – and it doesn’t matter how old or big you are as the sizes of your fist, fingers and arms are proportional with the rest of you – so it works for everyone!

Geoff takes us on a tour of the stars and constellations prominent in the March sky, including the bright star Aldebaran in the constellation of Taurus, and the bright star Betelgeuse in the constellation of Orion.

Geoff’s fascinating talk is enriched with historical and mythological astronomical references – ranging across cultues including Indigenous Australian, Arabic and ancient Greek.

For this and more, listen to the March 2014 night sky guide audio, or read the transcript below.

HEAR THE AUDIO
You can subscribe with iTunes or upload the (46 mins 48 secs) audio to your iPod or mp3 player, or listen to it on your computer.

SEE THE SKY CHART
We provide an embedded sky map (below – please be patient as it can take a little while for it to load) and a March 2014 night sky chart (PDF) which shows the stars, constellations and planets visible in the night sky from anywhere in Australia. To view PDF star charts you will need to download and install Adobe Acrobat Reader if it’s not on your computer already.

READ THE TRANSCRIPT (after the jump)

(more…)

To help you learn about the southern night sky, Sydney Observatory provides an audio guide/podcast, transcript of that audio, and a sky map or chart each month. This month’s guide is presented by Melissa Hulbert, Sydney Observatory’s Astronomy Education Officer.

Mel takes us on a tour of the stars and constellations prominent in the February sky, including associated tales from ancient mythology. Constellations to look for this month include Orion (whose shoulder or armpit is the star, Betelgeuse), Taurus and Canis Major (featuring the brightest star in the night sky, Sirius).

We can also see the second brightest star in the night sky this month – Canopus, part of the constellation of Carina (the keel) – formerly part of the constellation of Argo Narvis, associated with the myth of Jason and the Argonauts

For all this and also when we can see Jupiter, Saturn, Mars, Venus and Mercury this month, listen to the February 2014 night sky guide audio, or read the transcript below.

HEAR THE AUDIO
You can subscribe with iTunes or upload the (11 mins 17 secs) audio to your iPod or mp3 player, or listen to it on your computer.

SEE THE SKY CHART
We provide an embedded sky map (below – please be patient as it can take a little while for it to load) and a February 2014 night sky chart (PDF) which shows the stars, constellations and planets visible in the night sky from anywhere in Australia. To view PDF star charts you will need to download and install Adobe Acrobat Reader if it’s not on your computer already.

BUY THE BOOK
Our annual book, ‘The 2014 Australasian sky guide’ by Dr Nick Lomb has more information and star maps for months from December 2013 until December 2014 inclusive, plus information about the Sun, twilight, the Moon and tides, and a host of other fascinating astronomical information. You can purchase it ($16.95) at Sydney Observatory and Powerhouse Museum shops or other good bookshops, or online through Powerhouse Publishing (additional packing/postage costs apply).

READ THE TRANSCRIPT (after the jump)

(more…)

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