Close pass by space rock

Close pass by space rock

Published by Nick Lomb on June 28, 2006 No Comments

On Monday 3 July a space rock with the designation 2004 XP14 will pass relatively close to the Earth. The rock is between half and one kilometres in width, but there is no need to worry as at its closest it will still be 430,000 km away or just over the distance of the Moon from the Earth. Unfortunately, 2004 XP14 is too faint to be seen except by experienced observers with a telescope and preferably with a CCD camera. It will be in the Australian sky on the Monday morning until sunrise when it will be high in the east. Its brightness is then expected to be 12.8 mag which is about 600 times too faint to be seen by the unaided eye from a dark sky. The asteroid will be closest to Earth at 2 pm Australian Eastern Standard Time so it will not be visible and by that evening it will have moved so far to the north as to be constantly below the horizon as viewed from the southern hemisphere. For more information see
http://news.yahoo.com/s/space/20060626/sc_space/hugeasteroidtoflypastearthjuly3

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